gelBiomedical Facilities

Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Analysis
Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery
Instructional Computing
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

 

 

 



Biomedical imaging

 
 

Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Analysis

This laboratory, constructed in 2004, provides support for biomedical engineering research. The laboratory includes a scan area (for imaging human research subjects) and conventional benchtop space. The scan area is partitioned from the rest of the laboratory by hospital curtains for privacy. Major lab equipment includes a Siemens Antares commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine, tissue-mimicking phantoms, a ventilation hood, ultrasonic pulsers/receivers, arbitrary function generators, RF power amplifiers, digital oscilloscopes, and several custom-built translation tables. In addition, several National Instruments DAQ cards are contained within high-power workstations. Computing resources include MATLAB®, LabVIEW, and Visual C++ software. Most experimental setups are capable of full computer control. The laboratory is used for medical imaging studies and biosignal analysis, such as ultrasound mammography for breast cancer screening, echodentography, cardiovascular flow quantification, ECG/EEG instrumentation, and evoked potentials for neurological experiments.

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Biomaterials and gene delivery lab -pipette  

Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery

The overall goal of this lab is to understand the mechanisms which render cells responsive to DNA transfer, concentrating on the extracellular environment of the cell, as well as the intracellular processes and subsequent signaling involved during nonviral gene delivery. The lab is also collaborating with researchers both within and outside of the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, working to develop novel imaging and probing techniques to study cellular processes, including transfection kinetics, at the single cell level, as well as developing new biomaterials for gene delivery and tissue engineering applications. The main lab contains an enclosed dark room for fluorescence microscopy and 2 office workstations. Equipment within the main lab includes water purification systems, inverted Leica fluorescence microscope, Sorvall benchtop centrifuge, refrigerated microfuge, a fluorometer/ luminometer, UV/VIS spectrophotometer, Bio-Rad electrophoresis system, 4°C refrigerator, -20°C and -80°C freezers, as well as a bacterial incubator. The biosafety cabinet, Heracell CO2 incubators, cell microscope, liquid nitrogen tank, and a refrigerator are located in the adjacent cell culture lab.

More about this lab.

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Interactive computer lab  

Instructional Computing

Undergraduate and graduate students have access to a modern computer laboratory. This general laboratory has 26 Windows XP workstations (3.0 and 1.8 GHz) with LCD monitors along, with high-speed laser black-and-white and color printing, and a flatbed scanner. Each workstation has office tools and specialized engineering design and mechanized systems software. A Windows 2003 (active directory) domain server provides for individual student accounts, private storage, and daily backup. The lab is equipped with a digital projector and screen for software instruction and formal demonstrations.

All departmental computers operate on a network, connecting the entire campus and outside world through the internet. UNL faculty, staff, and students communicate using electronic mail, within the University and around the world, and have access to University and world-wide library sources. Students also have access to individual course materials 24-hours per day through the Academic Portal, a web-based support system for teaching. In addition, an adjacent student project design room has computer support and space for student projects. The department's full-time computer specialist is responsible for the daily operation of the network, account administration, and is available to solve computer problems. Instructional computing, video-based visualizers, and projected multimedia presentations are provided in the five classrooms in L. W. Chase Hall.

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mri  

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Located in the basement of Chase Hall is a Varian 400MHz 9.4T wide bore magnet (8.9 cm). This magnet room is devoted to the imaging of specimens and live mice and the construction of RG coils. Conventional MRI techniques produces pictures that can illustrate the contrast in soft tissues. The MRI is used with the next generation bioreactor for growth of tissue construction during in vitro culture.

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